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How Long Does a Speeding Ticket Stay on Your Record?

A speeding ticket stays on your record typically for three to seven years but it can be for shorter or longer depending on your state. However, this period generally refers to how long it takes for points to drop off from your DMV record. Even after points fall off your record, the speeding violation may still exist on your permanent record but that information may not be accessible to your insurer or employer after enough time has elapsed.

Speeding tickets can result in fines, increased insurance rates and other penalties. Learn more about how long it takes for a speeding ticket to drop off your DMV record in your state and tips to remove it or avoid it altogether.

When Does a Speeding Ticket Fall Off Your Driving Record?

A speeding ticket will generally take three to seven years to fall off your driving record depending on your state. That's the short answer. The long answer is a bit more nuanced and actually involves more specific questions. Below, we'll answer:

  • How long does it take for points from a speeding ticket to drop off of your driving record?

  • Does a speeding ticket stay on your permanent driving record?

  • How far back into your driving record can your employer or insurer see?

How Speeding Ticket Points Work

Most states have a point system that assigns points on your driver's license when you commit traffic violations, like speeding. When you reach a threshold — 12 points within one year, for instance — you may have your driver's license suspended. Speeding will usually count for two to six points against your driving record.

Over time, points will drop off your record. Generally, this can take anywhere from one to five years. However, the speeding violation may still remain on your permanent driving record.

How Your Permanent Driving Record Works

Some state DMVs retain your permanent driving record and it functions differently than the point system. Points dropping off your record over time may not erase the speeding violation from your permanent driving record.

There is little you can do about your permanent driving record, except fight the speeding citation or get your ticket deferred and subsequently dismissed (more on that later). Fortunately, your state may enforce restrictions on how far back your employer and insurance provider can look into your driving history.

Speeding tickets can result in fines, increased insurance rates and other penalties.

How Pulling Your Driving Record Works

Employers and insurance companies can typically only pull insurance records for a certain period — generally the most recent three to five years. Even if speeding violations were noted in your permanent driving record, it may not affect your employment opportunities or insurance rates if enough time has elapsed. For example, a speeding ticket received at 18 may not be viewable to a potential employer accessing your five-year driving record when you're 30 years old.

State Comparison: Speeding Ticket Length on Driving Record

The length of time a speeding ticket remains on your driving record typically takes three to five years but it will vary by state. The time thresholds below may reflect the speeding violation falling off your record or how far back your employers and insurance carriers can check. States that explicitly state that speeding ticket points fall off your record but remain on your permanent driving record are distinguished with an asterisk (*).

State

Speeding ticket length of time on driving record

Points against your driving record

Alabama

2 years*

2-5 points

Alaska

1-1.5 years

2-6 points

Arizona

1 year*

3 points

Arkansas

3 years

3-8 points

California

3 years, 3 months

2 points

Colorado

7 years

1-12 points

Connecticut

3 years

1 points

Delaware

5 years

2-5 points

District of Columbia

5 years

3 points

Florida

5 years

2-6 points

Georgia

10 years

N/A

Hawaii

3 years

3-4 points

Idaho

5 years

5-50 points

Illinois

2 years

2-6 points

Indiana

5 years*

N/A

Iowa

3 years

N/A

Kansas

5 years

3-6 points

Kentucky

5 years

N/A

Louisiana

1 year*

4-6 points

Maine

3 years

1-5 points

Maryland

N/A

2 points

Massachusetts

7 years

2-4 points

Michigan

10 years

N/A

Minnesota

N/A

N/A

Mississippi

3-5 years

3 points

Missouri

3 years*

3 points

Montana

5 years

0-4 points

Nebraska

1 year*

1-5 points

Nevada

3 years

3-4 points

New Hampshire

1 year*

2-5 points

New Jersey

1 year

N/A

New Mexico

1.5 years*

3-11 points

New York

7 years

3 points

North Carolina

1 point removed every 3 months

1-15 points

North Dakota

2 years

2-8 points

Ohio

3 years

2-4 points

Oklahoma

5 years

N/A

Oregon

1 year

2-5 points

Pennsylvania

N/A

N/A

Rhode Island

N/A

2-6 points

South Carolina

3 years

2 points

South Dakota

10 years

1-8 points

Tennessee

3 years

N/A

Texas

3 years

35-75 points

Utah

5-10 years

2-8 points

Vermont

11 years

6 points

Virginia

5 years

N/A

Washington

5 years

3-6 points

West Virginia

5 years

3-6 points

Wisconsin

10 years

N/A

Wyoming

2 years*

2-5 points

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Does Insurance Increase After a Speeding Ticket?

Auto insurance premiums will increase 20%, on average, when a speeding violation is listed in your driving record, according to Mercury Insurance. This can include any speeding tickets you received out-of-state. Car insurance in the U.S. costs $1,450.92 per year, on average — a speeding ticket may increase your annual premium by $290.

The increase may not always be immediate and your insurer may wait to increase your rates when you renew your policy. The insurance premium increase can remain in effect for up to three years.

A speeding ticket will generally take three to seven years to fall off your driving record depending on your state.

Below, we share sample rates before and after the rate increase for the ten states with the most number of licensed drivers.

States With the Most Number of Licensed Drivers*

Average Annual Premium for Minimum Required Limits

Annual Premium After 20% Increase

California

$997.08

$1,196.50

Texas

$967.32

$1,160.78

Florida

$1,611.12

$1,933.34

New York

$1,513.80

$1,816.56

Pennsylvania

$661.44

$793.73

Illinois

$729.72

$875.66

Ohio

$560.04

$672.05

North Carolina

$555.00

$666.00

Georgia

$1,092.84

$1,311.41

Michigan

$1,122.12

$1,346.54

Source: Statista

before and after the rate increase in car insurance for the ten states

Other Consequences of Getting a Speeding Ticket

Beyond points against your record, receiving a speeding ticket may have the following consequences:

  • You must pay a fine: Fines are based on how fast you were driving and the circumstances. For example, driving 10 mph over the speed limit incurs an $81 fine and increases to $126 fine for driving 30 mph over the posted limit. Speeding in certain areas, like a construction or school zone, can increase the fine. Fines may exceed $1,000 if somebody was injured as a result of your speeding.

  • You can't qualify for a "good driver" discount. Many auto insurers incentivize good drivers with a discount when they exhibit safe driving behaviors. This discount is quantified with their telematics technology that analyzes driving habits, such as braking, nighttime driving and of course, speeding.

  • You may be required to file Form SR-22. If you were speeding while also committing another major driving violation, like driving under the influence, then the court may require you to file Form SR-22. Form SR-22 is a financial responsibility certificate that confirms you meet the minimum car insurance limits in your state and requires your auto insurer to alert the DMV if you drop coverage.

  • Speeding can lead to fatalities. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, speed-related crashes accounted for 9,000 deaths (26% of all crash fatalities) in 2019. Speeding is a high-risk driving behavior where other people may pay the ultimate cost.

Auto insurance premiums will increase 20%, on average, when a speeding violation is listed in your driving record.

Tips To Get a Speeding Ticket off Your Record

Below are tips for clearing a speeding ticket from your record.

Drive With a Clean Record Until the Point Drops Off

Patience is sometimes the only way for a point to drop off your driving record. Focus on maintaining safe driving behaviors and you'll eventually see a clean driving record (and your insurance rates return to normal).

Complete a DMV-Approved Defensive Driver Course

Some states allow drivers to remove at least one point against their record by completing a defensive driver course, a program that teaches safe driving techniques (e.g., scanning the roadway for hazards and maintaining a safe distance behind the vehicle in front of you and more). Courses are sometimes available online and may be completed at your own pace — convenient for busy drivers.

Request To Get the Speeding Ticket Deferred

Depending on your state, you may be able to arrange with the court to have your ticket deferred to a later date. If you maintain a clean driving record up to the deferral date, the ticket may be dismissed and will not be recorded on your driving record. Not all states offer this option and you may need to pay filing and court fees. This option may be unavailable if you were speeding in a school or construction work zone or if somebody was injured.

Fight the Ticket

Contesting the ticket may result in a dismissal, preventing the violation from being recorded on your driver's record. This is not always possible and you may want to explore your chances for success by consulting an attorney. Just be conscious of the legal fees.

Consider Enrolling in a Telematics Program

A telematics program, like Allstate Drivewise (anyone can sign up), uses technology to analyze driving behaviors and rewards safe drivers with an auto insurance premium discount. This may not directly clear your driving record of a speeding ticket but it may incentivize safe driving habits than prevent you from speeding altogether.

FAQs

How long do speeding tickets stay on your driving record?

A speeding ticket will affect your driving record typically for three to seven years depending on your state. In some states, the time threshold may be as short as one year or as long as 11 years.

How long do points stay on your driving record?

Points for moving violations will stay on your record generally for one to five years. When points drop off your record, they will no longer count towards the suspension of your driving privileges. Speeding and other reckless driving violations may still be recorded in your permanent driving record even after the points expire.

How do you get a copy of your driving record?

Depending on your state's DMV, you may be able to obtain a copy of your driving record in person or by mail. Your DMV may charge you a fee for completing your DMV record request.

At what speed do you get a speeding ticket?

You will typically be at risk for a speeding ticket when driving 10 mph over the speed limit.

How much does a speeding ticket cost?

Your state, how fast you and where you were driving will determine how much a speeding ticket costs. In Oklahoma, for example, you may be fined $172 for driving 10 mph over the posted speed limit or $213 for driving 20 mph over the speed limit.

Shop Around, Even With a Speeding Ticket

If you have a speeding ticket that's increasing your premium rates, you can still shop around and find a lower rate. While you would still be paying higher rates with a speeding ticket than without, you may find a car insurance policy at a lower rate than your current insurer may offer you. SmartFinancial can help you explore coverages and rates from insurance carriers in your area. Enter your zip code below and complete a quick questionnaire for free quotes.

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